Health & Behavioral Studies Building

James Madison University

Harrisonburg, VA

Project Details +


The new interprofessional facility is designed to prepare students for today’s team-oriented healthcare work environment. The design creates a natively landscaped, pedestrian-oriented campus gathering place on the south while negotiating a full floor of topographic rise to the north. In accordance with the precinct master plan, the building fulfills the University’s aesthetic and campus goals of extending the historic Bluestone campus and creating a new, formal community entrance.

The facility is organized so that no single department dominates a floor. Dynamic signature learning spaces are distributed throughout the building along primary circulation routes, giving each department a distinct identity and facilitating interprofessional collaboration. Research labs designed to support faculty research provide opportunities for student research and hands-on learning. The building also serves the community through a separately zoned and easily accessible Speech and Hearing Clinic, exposing students to real-life clinical situations. 

Specialized learning spaces include mannequin and standardized patient laboratories; a health assessment teaching laboratory; a practical application teaching laboratory; a Dietetics suite including a production laboratory, a nutrition laboratory, and a dining room open to the campus and community; occupational therapy and athletic training teaching laboratories; group therapy spaces; and a home environment lab.

Building Facts

  • 150,000 GSF
  • LEED Silver design
  • 16 research labs
  • 20 classrooms
  • 22 teaching lab
  • 1 health clinic
  • 2 165-seat lecture halls 
  • Patient simulation lab
  • Occupational therapy
  • Dietetics
  • Athletic training
  • Communication science disorders
  • Social work
  • Food production lab
  • Hearing clinic

There was a lot of collaboration among the architects and all of our programs. That’s why it’s such a well-designed building.

Sharon Lovell Dean, College of Health & Behavioral Studies