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Design Giant

Office reception lobby

Interior Design magazine ranks EYP among the nation's best design firms in its 2018 Top 100 Giants list.  

Design Opportunities and Federal Government Funding

by Karl Stumpf

US Consulate in Erbil, Iraq

Building Design + Construction recently examined the balance of government agencies’ needs vs. available capital provided at the federal, state, and local government levels. EYP Government Sector Leader Karl Stumpf, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, remains hopeful about government design opportunities, especially in terms of office projects that cost effectively maximize space utilization. The article also explored several federal building projects as signs of investment in our country’s security and global impact, including the EYP-designed U.S. Consulate in Erbil, Iraq, which, upon completion, will be the largest such facility in the world.

X/O Skeleton Innovation Design Award Showcased in Numerous National Publications

The X/O Skeleton conceptual design, a recent winner of the international “Rethinking the Future” Award competition, continues to be showcased as a model of innovative, energy efficient design in a variety of key publications, including Architectural Digest, World Architecture News, and Next City.

atomicBIM: Splitting Data to Unleash BIM's Power

by John Tobin

The technical challenges facing BIM adoption today and in the future, are largely the result of legacy workflow protocols triggered by current software. Though our current BIM solutions have served us well over the last decade, they may not be built to lead us for future success. In particular, they have not created scalable, open or granular access to the information we create during design activities. To be most effective, future BIM implementation needs to consider the entire lifecycle of BIM data, including its consumption by downstream users. Current BIM applications create massive datasets, often within a single file. Given that we will have more – and more widely distributed – BIM teams in the future, greater granularity of BIM data will be vital for the collaborative consumption of information. Instead of continuing to create ever larger files, we need to conceptualize and structure the BIM environment for quick and easy access. We imagine an arrangement where BIM is comprised of many tiny pieces of data we are calling atomicBIM – i.e., BIM in small, discrete pieces of data. An atomized information structure would provide granularity and rapid access so that subsets of BIM information could be more easily accessed without a massive download.

4th Gen BIM: BIM for Owners

by John Tobin

While we currently operate largely within the 3rd generation of BIM, we increasingly see owner requirements that suggest the next generation of BIM is fast approaching. In the 4th generation of BIM – BI(m) – the information contained in the model becomes more important than the 3D model element itself. One of the more concrete examples of BI(m) is the COBie (Construction to Operation Building Information Exchange) requirement, where design and construction-phase information is transferred to an owner for the operation of the building. Instead of creating a mountain of paper, all the information on equipment within the BIM model – color, model, manufacturer, links to PDFs on the component - is extracted into a spreadsheet format so that owners can easily access information for the future maintenance and operation of building equipment. In this newest generation of BI(m), the owner is able to benefit from the information in the model without actually having to deal with the model itself.

Energy Analysis for Preservation Projects: The Right Tools at the Right Times

by Dana Kose

Birch Bayh Federal Building & US Courthouse

Using the right energy modeling tools at the right time in the design process is especially important in historic preservation, no matter what type of preservation is being undertaken.

A Brief History – and the Future – of BIM

by John Tobin

BIM detail

Due to the benefits of using 3D virtual models to guide real-world processes, BIM has gradually grown from its origins in BM (Building Modeling) into BI (Building Information) with various combinations of model and data in between. A Building Information model can be viewed as a collection of BIM ‘atoms’ of information in a context of project information. Over four generations - BM, BM+I, BIM, and BI(m) - the composition of the atoms has changed but the essential nucleus of information is preserved. We are now entering the phase where BIM is valued as much for the information it can contribute beyond design and construction, and there are clear use scenarios, such as COBie, where the information within the model is transferred even when the model itself is not.

Rethinking the Future of Sustainability Through Innovation and Creativity

X/O Skeleton

Celebrating the most impactful demonstrations of innovation in energy efficient design, the prestigious Rethinking the Future Award program honored the X/O Skeleton with a First Award in the Office Building (Concept) category. One of few winners selected out of 512 registrations from 30 nations, the forward-thinking design was inspired by natural organisms and proposes, “a new way of thinking about high-rise façade construction – one that minimizes the structure’s embodied energy, as well as its lifetime use.”

How do we measure human performance, and what does it mean for the workplace?

by Leigh Stringer

Houston office

How does your organization measure health and human performance? Well, the answer might vary depending on who you ask, but new tools and methods are taking a more comprehensive and objective approach to the study.

Honorable Guests Dedicate New U.S. Embassy in Oslo

US Embassy Oslo

Numerous international guests officially opened The New Embassy Compound in Oslo, Norway with a dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony. Demonstrating the highest levels of sustainability, safety, and innovative design features and seamlessly integrating with the area’s natural resources, the multi-building, organic complex includes a chancery, underground support annex, three entry pavilions, Marine security guard quarters, and workspace for approximately 200 embassy employees.

Historic Restoration of “Navy Yard Gem” Celebrated with National Preservation Honor

Historic Watch Box

Traditional Building magazine honored the restoration of the historically significant Watchbox with its prestigious Palladio Award. Originally constructed in the 1840s, the guard house, located at the Washington Navy Yard, served as a “check in” location for many visitors, including President Lincoln. After careful transport to the Navy Yard from Maryland where the structure was sited for more than 100 years, the preservation team meticulously restored the Watchbox to its original design, helping educate the public about the importance of the base, especially during the Civil War.

Designing Modern Embassies: Integrating Innovative Architecture with Rigorous Security and Efficiency Standards

US Embassy, Oslo

The balance of creating beautiful and innovative embassies that also exceed stringent safety, efficiency, and accessibility requirements is explored in the recent CNN article, “Diplomatic Design: New U.S. Embassies Make an Architectural Statement.” The EYP-designed embassy in Oslo, Norway, is one of only five global facilities selected to demonstrate successfully meeting this challenge.