Higher Education

Colleges and universities are reinventing the student experience to activate learning through collaborative discovery and research.

Creating Swing Space for Liberal Arts STEM Renovations

by Melissa Burns

Rollins College

Our feature in Tradeline reports on how the increased focus on STEM across higher education has a pronounced impact on liberal arts colleges, typically resulting in new construction or the renovation of existing science buildings.

Strategic Partnership with Harvard School of Public Health Enhances Global Well-Being

Featured in numerous national and international magazines, daily newspapers, and online business sources, EYP recently announced its participation in the Sustainability and Health Initiative for NetPositive Enterprise (SHINE) program at the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Spearheaded by its nationally-recognized high-performance design team and health and wellness experts, the firm specifically contributed to the development of the Health and Human Performance Index, creating a common language in defining and measuring well-being relating to the built environment. EYP also provided research-based data to help unlock the HHPI’s potential and evaluate organizational well-being across a variety of work settings.

Designing “Learning” into Living-Learning Environments: Alumni Hall at Pace University

by Sara Stein

Girl Studying

The design of Alumni Hall embodies what EYP has learned from previous studies about student preferences in residence halls. While students may appreciate having the latest technological or retail “bells and whistles” in residence halls, their primary preferences, it turns out, are actually much more basic.

Energy Analysis for Preservation Projects: The Right Tools at the Right Times

by Dana Kose

Birch Bayh Federal Building & US Courthouse

Using the right energy modeling tools at the right time in the design process is especially important in historic preservation, no matter what type of preservation is being undertaken.

4th Gen BIM: BIM for Owners

by John Tobin

While we currently operate largely within the 3rd generation of BIM, we increasingly see owner requirements that suggest the next generation of BIM is fast approaching. In the 4th generation of BIM – BI(m) – the information contained in the model becomes more important than the 3D model element itself. One of the more concrete examples of BI(m) is the COBie (Construction to Operation Building Information Exchange) requirement, where design and construction-phase information is transferred to an owner for the operation of the building. Instead of creating a mountain of paper, all the information on equipment within the BIM model – color, model, manufacturer, links to PDFs on the component - is extracted into a spreadsheet format so that owners can easily access information for the future maintenance and operation of building equipment. In this newest generation of BI(m), the owner is able to benefit from the information in the model without actually having to deal with the model itself.

atomicBIM: Splitting Data to Unleash BIM's Power

by John Tobin

The technical challenges facing BIM adoption today and in the future, are largely the result of legacy workflow protocols triggered by current software. Though our current BIM solutions have served us well over the last decade, they may not be built to lead us for future success. In particular, they have not created scalable, open or granular access to the information we create during design activities. To be most effective, future BIM implementation needs to consider the entire lifecycle of BIM data, including its consumption by downstream users. Current BIM applications create massive datasets, often within a single file. Given that we will have more – and more widely distributed – BIM teams in the future, greater granularity of BIM data will be vital for the collaborative consumption of information. Instead of continuing to create ever larger files, we need to conceptualize and structure the BIM environment for quick and easy access. We imagine an arrangement where BIM is comprised of many tiny pieces of data we are calling atomicBIM – i.e., BIM in small, discrete pieces of data. An atomized information structure would provide granularity and rapid access so that subsets of BIM information could be more easily accessed without a massive download.

A Brief History – and the Future – of BIM

by John Tobin

BIM detail

Due to the benefits of using 3D virtual models to guide real-world processes, BIM has gradually grown from its origins in BM (Building Modeling) into BI (Building Information) with various combinations of model and data in between. A Building Information model can be viewed as a collection of BIM ‘atoms’ of information in a context of project information. Over four generations - BM, BM+I, BIM, and BI(m) - the composition of the atoms has changed but the essential nucleus of information is preserved. We are now entering the phase where BIM is valued as much for the information it can contribute beyond design and construction, and there are clear use scenarios, such as COBie, where the information within the model is transferred even when the model itself is not.

How do we measure human performance, and what does it mean for the workplace?

by Leigh Stringer

Houston office

How does your organization measure health and human performance? Well, the answer might vary depending on who you ask, but new tools and methods are taking a more comprehensive and objective approach to the study.

New Health-Focused High School Provides Unprecedented Access to Hospitals and Hands-On Medical Education

Located in the heart of the renowned Texas Medical Center, the newly opened Michael E. DeBakey High School for Health Professions provides its students with a medical education unlike any other. The first health-focused high school in the United States, the new 194,000-sf facility includes mock hospital rooms, science and research labs, and teaching spaces for dentistry, rehabilitation, and other medical practices. Close proximity to some of the country’s best doctors and medical centers and regular hospital rotations as part of the school’s curriculum allows its students to engage in on-site, hands-on learning, dramatically expanding educational opportunities.

It Takes a Team to Make it Clean

by Jeff Schantz

Brookhaven National Laboratory, photo credit: Rebecca Coles

Cleanrooms for nanofabrication, bioengineering and tissue processing are among the most technically complex and costly core facilities to build. Architecture alone can't realize these special spaces: it takes a team of expert collaborators.

Project Delivery with BIM: Use Cases

by Ervin Kulenica, John Tobin

EYP currently uses BIM software in all disciplines and for all new projects. Certain projects stand out from the scores of BIM projects we’ve completed over the past 10+ years: modeling a large historic structure; using BIM files to expedite steep procurement; and assisting asset coordination and management using custom BIM components. Recent projects, such as ZEN and Penn State’s Agricultural Engineering Building, pivot on the use of BIM in an integrated "Big Room" setting where owner, contractors, and design teams all use BIM as the locus of discussion. Increasingly this "Big Room" approach is considered the future of BIM use by collaborative teams. From lean documentation and design review to phase planning and more, this article discusses the many ways in which EYP continues to lead the industry in leveraging the power of BIM.

The Future of the College Campus

by Sara Stein

University of Michigan North Quad

Colleges and universities are looking beyond traditional planning strategies – including expanding technology, reimagining buildings, and engaging the community – to get the most out of their campuses. Emerging technologies – such as augmented reality, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence – will eventually shape what the physical campus of the future will look like, but not replace it. We'll also likely see an increase in conversations between campus planners and off-campus developers and city councils, maximizing the future of college campuses.