News & Publications: Workplace Strategy

USA Today profiles how Leigh's expertise supported LL Bean's campaign, Be an Outsider at Work and the accompanying research initiative, demonstrating the many health and wellness benefits of working outdoors and how it can be normalized.

Leigh Stringer gives a synopsis of her research into outdoor workplaces with the Mind Body Green news website.

Forbes recently spotlighted L.L.Bean's partnership with EYP workplace expert Leigh Stringer. The article gives a synopsis of the data and conclusions made by Leigh and L.L.Bean's team.

April 12, 2018

The People Have Spoken

EYP's Atlanta office wins AIA Georgia's Peoples Choice Award

Slate magazine looks at Wellness in the Workplace

Learning by Design profiles Workplace expert Leigh Stringer’s findings on campus well-being and mental health.

Leigh Stringer’s Work Design research-based article explores workplace design strategies that support emotional safety while proactively reducing the opportunity for unacceptable behavior to occur.

American Builders Quarterly highlights our expertise on developing wellness-oriented solutions for today’s ever-evolving office space.

How does your organization measure health and human performance? Well, the answer might vary depending on who you ask, but new tools and methods are taking a more comprehensive and objective approach to the study. More

EYP's Leigh Stringer is one of the experts quoted in the Wall Street Journal article, "Why You Can't Concentrate at Work." “Visual noise,” activity or movement around the edges of an employee's field of vision, is disruptive to analytical thinking and creativity. Experts weigh in on why visual noise has become an issue for many workers and shares examples of how some firms are dialing down distractions so their employees can better concentrate on their jobs. Successful tactics include modifying work station layouts; using plants to create green “walls”; and establishing quiet buffer zones between work spaces. Leigh offers her perspective on visibility's impact on employees. "Being visible to bosses and colleagues can make workers in some jobs feel pressured to conform to others’ expectations. If employees default to keeping their heads down and typing on their computers to look busy, rather than taking time to reflect or brainstorming with others, innovation or analytical work may suffer."