Student Life

Ubiquitous technology enables a 24/7 student lifestyle that blurs the traditional boundaries between academic, residential, and social spaces.

Related Brochures

Among all the building types on an academic campus, the student center is inherently the most democratic – a building of the students, by the students, and for the students. More

EYP is partnering with the University of Virginia to research the impact of our recently designed McLeod Tyler Wellness Center. Part of the College of William and Mary campus, this new student health center combines several health and wellness services into one facility - and our research will examine the beneficial effects of this new space on faculty and students. More

More and more colleges and universities are realizing they need improved health and wellness facilities that better address today’s students’ health concerns. More

Building Design + Construction features Higher Education Leader John Baxter and the trend of institutions opting for more economical residence halls.

The study compares and analyzes responses from students in three living-learning environments - at Pace University, Michigan State University, and the University of Michigan - regarding interactions with peers and faculty; involvement in co- and extra-curricular activities; and satisfaction with their residence hall environment. More

The design of Alumni Hall at Pace University embodies what EYP has learned from previous research on how students use space, and how that space can influence outcomes. More

Colleges and universities are looking beyond traditional planning strategies – including expanding technology, reimagining buildings, and engaging the community – to get the most out of their campuses. Emerging technologies – such as augmented reality, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence – will eventually shape what the physical campus of the future will look like, but not replace it. We'll also likely see an increase in conversations between campus planners and off-campus developers and city councils, maximizing the future of college campuses. More

Kresge Auditorium and the MIT Chapel are once again taking center stage in the architectural world. More

Students today live a 24/7 lifestyle, so residential life and campus dining teams are adapting to improve student services, wellness, and opportunities for community engagement. An increasing number of campuses are integrating food into the residence hall – not only in apartments and suite-style units, but also as focused community spaces that serve residents in a variety of ways. Vibrant social spaces with soft seating, flexible furniture, and a kitchen or food-prep area are popular with good reason: food has always served a cultural function – at the center of social occasions and even unifying regions. In a residence hall, integrating community kitchens and/or a food-service function can highlight the importance that food plays in wellness, education and culture. A kitchen can support residential life programming, enable students to share their culinary heritage, and logistically complement somewhat limited weekend or late-night food service elsewhere on campus. Our recent projects with Trinity College, Duke University, and Pace University integrate food service in varying ways to enhance residential life programs and enrich the student experience. More

Architecture DC showcases a modernization/new construction project: the Bethune Dining Hall Annex at Howard University. An AIA DC Merit Award Winner, the building exemplifies the trend for campus facilities that let in the sunshine to enhance the student experience, foster community, and advance energy and sustainability goals. This signature design has dramatically “transformed a stopping place for food into a happy social and cultural gathering place.”  

Our research assesses how shared space types facilitate learning within the University of Michigan’s North Quad Academic & Housing Complex. More

We systematically investigate the impact of the spatial environment itself on student engagement, perceived experience, and sense of community. Our investigations at Michigan State University build on our living-learning research at the University of Michigan to provide evidence to how the architectural design of college residence halls impacts student engagement and development. More