Workplace

How people work is continuously changing because of technological advances and shifts in mobility, globalization, demographics and economics.

February 19, 2018

Design Giant

Interior Design magazine ranks EYP among the nation's best design firms in its 2018 Top 100 Giants list.  

The X/O Skeleton conceptual design, a recent winner of the international “Rethinking the Future” Award competition, continues to be showcased as a model of innovative, energy efficient design in a variety of key publications, including Architectural Digest, World Architecture News, and Next City.

Celebrating the most impactful demonstrations of innovation in energy efficient design, the prestigious Rethinking the Future Award program honored the X/O Skeleton with a First Award in the Office Building (Concept) category. One of few winners selected out of 512 registrations from 30 nations, the forward-thinking design was inspired by natural organisms and proposes, “a new way of thinking about high-rise façade construction – one that minimizes the structure’s embodied energy, as well as its lifetime use.”

How does your organization measure health and human performance? Well, the answer might vary depending on who you ask, but new tools and methods are taking a more comprehensive and objective approach to the study. More

EYP's Leigh Stringer is one of the experts quoted in the Wall Street Journal article, "Why You Can't Concentrate at Work." “Visual noise,” activity or movement around the edges of an employee's field of vision, is disruptive to analytical thinking and creativity. Experts weigh in on why visual noise has become an issue for many workers and shares examples of how some firms are dialing down distractions so their employees can better concentrate on their jobs. Successful tactics include modifying work station layouts; using plants to create green “walls”; and establishing quiet buffer zones between work spaces. Leigh offers her perspective on visibility's impact on employees. "Being visible to bosses and colleagues can make workers in some jobs feel pressured to conform to others’ expectations. If employees default to keeping their heads down and typing on their computers to look busy, rather than taking time to reflect or brainstorming with others, innovation or analytical work may suffer."

Most of us use computers daily but we generally don’t think much about the infrastructure necessary to keep them connected and safe. Merton Bunker recently authored an article explaining that IT equipment areas are often misunderstood in this respect, as the requirement contained in NFPA 75: Standard for the Fire Protection of Informational Technology Equipment can be confusing.

Can healthcare facilities promote patient and staff wellness while also engaging with the community and incorporating other sustainability principles? Thanks to organizations like Planetree and the Urban Land Institute's Health Places Initiatives, there is a growing awareness of the link between design and well-being. In this article from Medical Construction & Design, Tushar and Laurie provide snapshots of current buildings and features that address these issues, all while applying the latest techniques for infection control.

Leigh Stringer shares the origin story of The Healthy Workplace, and why health is an important topic for the industry and for business in general, in this article for Work Design Magazine.  She shares some surprising findings during research and describes “what a healthy workplace looks and feels like” based on her visits to many leading organizations that focus on health.

Leigh Stringer shares some of the research from The Healthy Workplace with HR professionals. In this article for HR Voice, she discusses 10 habits that should be banned from the workplace altogether, such as working while sitting for long periods of time; working indoors all day; letting papers pile up; emailing on vacation; and not taking a vacation or going to work while sick.

Leigh Stringer shares some of the research from her bestseller,  The Healthy Workplace, with technology professionals in this article for CIO Magazine.  Her 10 tips for improving productivity at work include building in flexibility as to how, when and where you work; leveraging “biophilia”; leveraging choice architecture; and creating nudges to encourage healthy behaviors in the workspace.

Pete Mockaitis interviews thought-leaders and results-getters for his How to Be Awesome at Your Job podcast to discover specific, actionable insights that boost work performance.  In this episode, he asks Leigh Stringer about how the workplace can impact health, engagement and productivity.

Leigh Stringer shares the business case for healthy and engaged employees with Contract Magazine.“Clearly, human health is a driving force for business growth. But how can the built environment play a more meaningful role? Besides the obvious solutions, such as providing sit-stand desks and access to natural light, how can workplace design positively impact health and, ultimately, human performance?” This article includes five particularly compelling workplace strategies.