Science & Technology

Research today is a highly social and connected enterprise requiring flexible, adaptable, and technology-infused spaces. We specialize in solutions-based project delivery.

Strategic Partnership with Harvard School of Public Health Enhances Global Well-Being

Featured in numerous national and international magazines, daily newspapers, and online business sources, EYP recently announced its participation in the Sustainability and Health Initiative for NetPositive Enterprise (SHINE) program at the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Spearheaded by its nationally-recognized high-performance design team and health and wellness experts, the firm specifically contributed to the development of the Health and Human Performance Index, creating a common language in defining and measuring well-being relating to the built environment. EYP also provided research-based data to help unlock the HHPI’s potential and evaluate organizational well-being across a variety of work settings.

Examining the Future of Research Facility Design

The Tradeline article, “The Future of Research Facility Design,” compares today’s laboratory design environment with that of five years ago, while exploring trends that effect how institutions determine how and when to build and/or renovate laboratory spaces. EYP Science and Technology Sector Leader Jeffrey Schantz shares his expertise on research facility design, commenting on several trends including a notable shift toward convergence science, the increased need for flexible spaces, and incorporating sustainability to boost research labs’ return on investment.

X/O Skeleton Innovation Design Award Showcased in Numerous National Publications

The X/O Skeleton conceptual design, a recent winner of the international “Rethinking the Future” Award competition, continues to be showcased as a model of innovative, energy efficient design in a variety of key publications, including Architectural Digest, World Architecture News, and Next City.

4th Gen BIM: BIM for Owners

by John Tobin

While we currently operate largely within the 3rd generation of BIM, we increasingly see owner requirements that suggest the next generation of BIM is fast approaching. In the 4th generation of BIM – BI(m) – the information contained in the model becomes more important than the 3D model element itself. One of the more concrete examples of BI(m) is the COBie (Construction to Operation Building Information Exchange) requirement, where design and construction-phase information is transferred to an owner for the operation of the building. Instead of creating a mountain of paper, all the information on equipment within the BIM model – color, model, manufacturer, links to PDFs on the component - is extracted into a spreadsheet format so that owners can easily access information for the future maintenance and operation of building equipment. In this newest generation of BI(m), the owner is able to benefit from the information in the model without actually having to deal with the model itself.

atomicBIM: Splitting Data to Unleash BIM's Power

by John Tobin

The technical challenges facing BIM adoption today and in the future, are largely the result of legacy workflow protocols triggered by current software. Though our current BIM solutions have served us well over the last decade, they may not be built to lead us for future success. In particular, they have not created scalable, open or granular access to the information we create during design activities. To be most effective, future BIM implementation needs to consider the entire lifecycle of BIM data, including its consumption by downstream users. Current BIM applications create massive datasets, often within a single file. Given that we will have more – and more widely distributed – BIM teams in the future, greater granularity of BIM data will be vital for the collaborative consumption of information. Instead of continuing to create ever larger files, we need to conceptualize and structure the BIM environment for quick and easy access. We imagine an arrangement where BIM is comprised of many tiny pieces of data we are calling atomicBIM – i.e., BIM in small, discrete pieces of data. An atomized information structure would provide granularity and rapid access so that subsets of BIM information could be more easily accessed without a massive download.

A Brief History – and the Future – of BIM

by John Tobin

BIM detail

Due to the benefits of using 3D virtual models to guide real-world processes, BIM has gradually grown from its origins in BM (Building Modeling) into BI (Building Information) with various combinations of model and data in between. A Building Information model can be viewed as a collection of BIM ‘atoms’ of information in a context of project information. Over four generations - BM, BM+I, BIM, and BI(m) - the composition of the atoms has changed but the essential nucleus of information is preserved. We are now entering the phase where BIM is valued as much for the information it can contribute beyond design and construction, and there are clear use scenarios, such as COBie, where the information within the model is transferred even when the model itself is not.

Rethinking the Future of Sustainability Through Innovation and Creativity

X/O Skeleton

Celebrating the most impactful demonstrations of innovation in energy efficient design, the prestigious Rethinking the Future Award program honored the X/O Skeleton with a First Award in the Office Building (Concept) category. One of few winners selected out of 512 registrations from 30 nations, the forward-thinking design was inspired by natural organisms and proposes, “a new way of thinking about high-rise façade construction – one that minimizes the structure’s embodied energy, as well as its lifetime use.”

How do we measure human performance, and what does it mean for the workplace?

by Leigh Stringer

Houston office

How does your organization measure health and human performance? Well, the answer might vary depending on who you ask, but new tools and methods are taking a more comprehensive and objective approach to the study.

Strategic Project Phasing in Partnership with Higher Education Institutions

Whether a higher education building project involves renovation or new construction (or both), collaborating with the institution early in the process to develop a phasing strategy will keep financial goals on track and minimize impact on students and faculty. This article, featuring extensive comments from EYP academic and science planning experts Toni Loiacano and Melissa Burns, compares and contrasts three phased EYP projects that each successfully met the complex needs of end users and the institutions as a whole.

It Takes a Team to Make it Clean

by Jeff Schantz

Brookhaven National Laboratory, photo credit: Rebecca Coles

Cleanrooms for nanofabrication, bioengineering and tissue processing are among the most technically complex and costly core facilities to build. Architecture alone can't realize these special spaces: it takes a team of expert collaborators.

Why You Can't Concentrate at Work

EYP's Leigh Stringer is one of the experts quoted in the Wall Street Journal article, "Why You Can't Concentrate at Work." “Visual noise,” activity or movement around the edges of an employee's field of vision, is disruptive to analytical thinking and creativity. Experts weigh in on why visual noise has become an issue for many workers and shares examples of how some firms are dialing down distractions so their employees can better concentrate on their jobs. Successful tactics include modifying work station layouts; using plants to create green “walls”; and establishing quiet buffer zones between work spaces. Leigh offers her perspective on visibility's impact on employees. "Being visible to bosses and colleagues can make workers in some jobs feel pressured to conform to others’ expectations. If employees default to keeping their heads down and typing on their computers to look busy, rather than taking time to reflect or brainstorming with others, innovation or analytical work may suffer."

Project Delivery with BIM: Use Cases

by Ervin Kulenica, John Tobin

EYP currently uses BIM software in all disciplines and for all new projects. Certain projects stand out from the scores of BIM projects we’ve completed over the past 10+ years: modeling a large historic structure; using BIM files to expedite steep procurement; and assisting asset coordination and management using custom BIM components. Recent projects, such as ZEN and Penn State’s Agricultural Engineering Building, pivot on the use of BIM in an integrated "Big Room" setting where owner, contractors, and design teams all use BIM as the locus of discussion. Increasingly this "Big Room" approach is considered the future of BIM use by collaborative teams. From lean documentation and design review to phase planning and more, this article discusses the many ways in which EYP continues to lead the industry in leveraging the power of BIM.